NORFOLK Museums Service
Homes Long Ago, KS1 at Gressenhall Farm and Workhouse

KS2 - Workhouse Whodunnit?

Find out about life in Victorian England through our dramatic Key Stage 2 Whodunnit. This event uses our workhouse buildings and museum displays as atmospheric backdrops to a dramatic murder mystery that really brings history alive and helps children empathise with people in the past.

Children help the detective to discover who has committed the terrible crime. They question costumed characters, both rich and poor, and engage in active learning sessions in our Victorian schoolroom, cottage kitchen, workhouse and laundry. The day encourages communication skills and offers the perfect basis for literacy work. The Victorian Workhouse Whodunnit is a Key Stage 2 schools event. It is particularly suited to years 5 and 6. To enter into the spirit of Victorian life we invite you to come in costume.

    “We all had an absolutely fabulous time. They engaged in History on so many levels. The murder mystery brought out the use of historical evidence, historical empathy as well as a wealth of knowledge. It was great seeing the children working together to solve the mystery.”

Teacher (year 5)

    “Thank you for the wonderful time we had when we were solving the crime, it helped us learn lots of history.”

Joseph (year 5)

    “I especially liked the fact that it wasn’t just about what Victorian workhouse life was like but it was also a murder mystery game.”

Danielle (year 6)

    “Thank you very much! I now know how terrible it must have been in a workhouse. I really enjoyed the murder mystery part .”

Matthew (year 6)

Dates:

2012:

November 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29

2013:

February 12, 13, 14, 26, 27, 28

Cost:

£4.50 per child

For more information

tel: 01362 869251

email: fiona.lund@norfolk.gov.uk

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